USING THE BUD AMP

Using the JazzAmp™ is pretty much straight forward except that an explanation of the use of the equalizer channels is in order. Other than that, there is a single input for your instrument and a line out which will deliver the signal from the preamp to an external board if you wish.

On the EQ, the control does not change the frequency of the tone being passed as it does with a conventional tone control. The controls are best thought of as a volume control for only the frequency that is marked.

The controls are labeled in Hz and kHz. The term Hz or Hertz, replaced the phrase cycles per second. k represents the number 1000. So 1kHz is equal to 1000 cycles per second. In musical terms, we are familiar with term A-440. the 440 is equal to cycles per second, or in modern electronic language 440 Hz. The term frequency is the number of times per second that the note oscillates, or vibrates.

To correlate this to the EQ on the JazzAmp There are two more things that are necessary to understand:

  • A-440 is the fundamental or center frequency of the note. A vibrating string has many harmonics, or overtones and undertones, in addition to the fundamental frequency.
  • The frequencies as marked on the JazzAmp are the center frequency that is affected by the control. A frequency range from half the center to twice the center is affected by the control. Thus, the 100 Hz control will effect the volume of frequencies between 50Hz and 200Hz. The 300Hz control will have an effect on frequencies from 150Hz to 600 Hz, ect.

Begin with all the EQ controls set on the 0 mark, or half way. Turning any control clockwise increases the volume of the selected frequency by up to 10db while turning the knob counterclockwise will decrease the selected frequency by up to -10db.

You will note that the 10 kHz appears to have little affect, while the 100 Hz has a great deal of effect on the sound. The 3 kHz will appear to have minimal effect, but more than the 10 kHz. This is because the highest A note on the guitar at the 17th fret only has a fundamental frequency of 880 Hz. The higher controls (10 kHz and 3 kHz) are either increasing or decreasing only the harmonic overtones produced by your guitar.

The 100 Hz, the 300 Hz and the 1 kHz have a direct effect on the fundamental notes on your guitar. Let us suppose that you have a guitar whose pickup has a disproportionately loud output on the lower E string. In the past you have dealt with this by rolling off the standard bass control. But in so doing the price you pay is that the top E string gets thin sounding. On the JazzAmp you can turn down the volume of the 100 Hz control to balance the output of the pickup without affecting the sound of the top E string at all. Practically speaking this is the actual meaning of the term Equalize.

As you play with the controls you can see that the three controls of lower frequency 100 Hz, 300 Hz and 1 kHz all have different effects on different strings.

If you have a guitar for which the signal output is both acoustically and electrically (the pickup) balanced from the highest notes to the lowest notes, then the proper position for all of the controls should remain set on 0.

The best way to use the EQ is to spend some time in a controlled space and play while listening to the sound. If you find that any area of the neck seems too strong or too weak work with the corresponding EQ channel until you are happy with the balance.

You will notice that the tone control on your guitar has a greater effect on the brightness or darkness than you might be accustomed to. The natural warmth of your guitar will shine through both in bright or treble, and dark or bass settings of your guitars tone control. Let your ear be your guide.

In a gig situation, after you are familiar with how your EQ needs to generally be adjusted in your home space, you may find that the room carries sound disproportionately such as too much bass or treble. You will be able to use the EQ to compensate for poor rooms without messing up your basic tone by adjusting slightly the EQ for the offending frequency of the room.

Knob Control Key
100 Hz overlap 300 Hz overlap 1 kHz
Fret E A D G B E
0 82.41 110 146.83 196 246.94 329.63
1 87.31 116.54 155.56 207.65 261.63 349.23
2 92.5 123.47 164.81 220 277.18 369.99
3 98 130.81 174.61 233.08 293.66 392
4 103.83 138.59 185 246.94 311.13 415.3
5 110 146.83 196 261.63 329.63 440
6 116.54 155.56 207.65 277.18 349.23 466.16
7 123.47 164.81 220 293.66 369.99 493.88
8 130.81 174.61 233.08 311.13 392 523.25
9 138.59 185 246.94 329.63 415.3 554.37
10 146.83 196 261.63 349.23 440 587.33
11 155.56 207.65 277.18 369.99 466.16 622.25
12 164.81 220 293.66 392 493.88 659.26
13 174.61 233.08 311.13 415.3 523.25 698.46
14 185 246.94 329.63 440 554.37 739.99
15 196 261.63 349.23 466.16 587.33 783.99
16 207.65 277.18 369.99 493.88 622.25 830.61
17 220 293.66 392 523.25 659.26 880
18 233.08 311.13 415.3 554.37 698.46 932.33
19 246.94 329.63 440 587.33 739.99 987.77
20 261.63 349.23 466.16 622.25 783.99 1046.5
21 277.18 369.99 493.88 659.26 830.61 1108.73
22 293.66 392 523.25 698.46 880 1174.66
23 311.13 415.3 554.37 739.99 932.33 1244.51
24 329.63 440 587.33 783.99 987.77 1318.51
25 349.23 466.16 622.25 830.61 1046.5