No one likes hauling gear. Simplify your setup, focus on your performance and enjoy playing.

Change the way you gig.

You’ve seen it, or perhaps been there yourself: a small restaurant gig with a mic’d guitar amplifier, a mixer for vocals, a power amp for the mixer, two PA speakers on stands, and a floor wedge or two… all for a 2000 square foot room with 50 people in it. The musicians do their best to soundcheck, but the volume ends up being so loud that the entire front of the place is empty, and people at the back have to shout to be heard. No one seems happy with their sound and in spite of all the volume, still can’t seem to hear themselves. After the gig it takes an hour to pack it all up and haul everything to the car 4 blocks away.

The Bud is all you need!

If you’re like most acoustic musicians, you do not need a PA, you do not need floor wedges, and you don’t need speaker stands for 90% of your gigs. At 120 watts The Bud amplifier, by itself, is more than loud enough to amplify instruments or voices to gig levels in most venues you’re going to be playing (it easily fills our 3600 square foot warehouse, watch the videos on this page for proof). The Bud’s analog design also projects the true quality of tone of your instrument without compromise. Not only are you able to do the gig with less equipment, you’re going to sound better doing it.

Dave Tamkin and Brad Huffman performing live at The Factory Stage at Henriksen Amplifiers. Here they are performing Dave’s original tune, “Demons and You.” They are running acoustic guitar (with a monster fx board) and vocals through one Bud Amplifier and electric guitar (with a monster fx board) and vocals through another Bud Amplifier.

Dave Tamkin explains how to use The Bud Amplifiers FX Loop. The FX loop sends the signal from the amp post-EQ and returns it pre-reveb.

Castle Byers performing their original tune, “What Would You Do”, at The Factory Stage at Henriksen Amplifiers. Guitar and vocals were both run through a single Bud Amplifier for each musician.

Dickie (www.dickiemusic.com) performing their original tune, “Happier Me”, at The Factory Stage at Henriksen Amplifiers. Guitar and vocals were both run through a single Bud Amplifier. Violin and vocals were run through a single Bud Amplifier. Bass Sax was run through a JazzAmp312.

Live from The Factory Stage; Sean and Andrea McGowan performing “Sometimes It Snows in April” by Prince. Both vocals and guitar are straight through a single Bud Amplifier. No processing or effects. Recorded live with a Zoom H2.

M. Smith (msmithmusic.com) stopped the The Factory Stage at Henriksen Amplifiers to perform a few tunes and promote a show he had a couple days after. Guitar and vocals were all run through a single Bud Amplifier.